Pick-A-Day

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So I am 15…

Really, I should be embarrassed beyond words, but I have a juvenile sense of humor at times.

Yesterday I was on my way from downtown to the grocery store near my house, minding my own sweet business—when I saw the license plate of a car I was passing. It immediately gave me the giggles and I pulled out the camera.

If I were any less classy, I would have returned with a screwdriver.

If I were any less classy, I would have returned with a screwdriver.

Hats off to this Coburg resident for thinking creatively. I used to think that people in Weimar could get creative with their “WE” prefix (WEST, WENT, WERE, to name three), but clearly Weimar has been out-classed.

16 comments to So I am 15…

  • Adam,
    It’s definitely a German version of the vanity plate. You should have left a note tucked under the wipers. 🙂

  • yes you are childish and infantile. but then again so am i. do you think the driver had any idea he had a cock following him around?

  • […] post info By ian in hamburg Categories: Expat, Germany, Hamburg, cars, driver, driving, friends, humor, humour and life Tags: license plate, Pinneberg … and he’s definitely found what he was looking for. […]

  • Here in Bavaria, one often sees license plates from Fürth (FÜ). No-one yet seems to have recognised the creative opportunity.

    On the other hand, people from nearby Starnberg (STA), a posh exurb of Munich with a lot of expat families, frequently declare themselves STA*RS, or to be from the STA*TE 5.

    In Munich proper, M*AX is one of the most sought-after vanity combinations, because we’re fond of Maximillians.

    I agree with Ian. You should have left a note asking whether the 99 refers to centimetres, inches, or numbers serviced per week.

  • It’s a good thing that Cuxhaven is abbreviated CUX and not CU.

  • This is a great lesson on why it’s a good idea to always carry a camera around while out and about. If I ever see a PI MP again, I’ll post it. 🙂

  • @Ian: My iPhone’s camera is quite good–it took the picture above. I carry it everywhere. If I expect to take photos, I take around my digital camera that’s quite good as well. — what shoul dmy note have said, btw?

    @Dave: The question for me was, is 99 in mm, cm, inches, or meters?

    @Headbang: Serviced per week? One would never need to eat any other protein.

    @indeterminancy: CUX doesn’t give one many opportunities for fun…

  • These remind me of the CUM bookstore chain we saw in South Africa. I guess I was reliving my youth on that one myself. 😉

  • Your note? Something in English, of course, maybe asking whether that combination of letters was an accident, your telephone number / an email address?

  • @CQ: Ah… CUM–it was all the more special because it was a Christian bookstore chain. The memories… it warms my heart.

    @Ian: You crafty guy! I could have had a date! Although with my luck it would have been a lesbian with a strap-on.

  • Jul

    Whatever the 99 refers to, you’ve got to respect the fact that they went for the largest number possible with 2 digits… why have 98 cocks when you can have 99?

  • Katya

    just a thought…
    what if the (poor) owner doesn’t speak english (or has never heard of this exact word) and got this plate as a random, not custom one…

  • @Jul: 99 could show a lack of restraint, whilst 98 shows a man who knows his limits. Just a theory, of course…

    @Katya: That is possible–however I suspect the 99 indicates its custom. Even if it’s not, it would be cruel for the city to issue the plate to unsuspecting individuals… plus given its location just inside the West (historically speaking), I believe its near a number of ex-US military bases… but I’m not an expert on military deployments of the past.

  • Hi Adam, dunno why I never thought of it before, but I submitted a link to this post via Twitter to the CreepyVanityPlates people. Maybe you’ll get more linkage back!

  • J

    actually, that’s the most popular one here, but the first letter is a K instead of a C.