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Welcome to Fabulous Las… Jena?

Something’s been lost in translation…
Las Jenas

What happens in Vegas Jena, stays in Vegas Jena!

6 comments to Welcome to Fabulous Las… Jena?

  • WTF?

    Is that at the train station. That place looks familiar to me for some reason.

  • “Fabulous” as in “likely to be a fable.”

    Thüringers may have little cred in the glamour stakes, but you gott hand it to them for persistence. Witness the Fireman’s calendar, too.

  • Prashanth

    it should be “Last Jena”……outside Thuerigen, very few people know about Jena!…heck! people in Jena do not know what is Jena!!

  • Cynical Queer – That is, in fact, the Jena West train station, and its a part of a campaign to get residents of Jena to register Jena as their main residence–it affects the tax dollars the city gets from the state.

    headbang8 – Thuringen might be a drive-across state, but it is a state with pride!

    Prashanth – Viva Lost Wages…

  • OK, so are people so embarrassed about living in Jena that they register their residence elsewhere? Or is this more like how some people in the US are living in one city while they register and insure their car elsewhere because it is cheaper? IE there is an advantage to saying you don’t live in Jena?

    • I believe that there are no tax advantages/disadvantages to where you register your principle residence, except to how much money the city gets. Nor should it affect insurance rates or any other similar things…

      Jena’s problem is that it’s a college town and a lot of students who come and, essentially, live in Jena only register it as a secondary home–even though they spend the vast majority of their time in Jena. They might only visit their so-called principle residence on the weekends, and maybe only once a month. Consequently their childhood home benefits from their residence while Jena struggles to provide adequate infrastructure.

      It’s similar to how US cities try to make sure everybody, including the homeless, are counted during the census because it affects funding levels.